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Yajurveda is one of the four Vedas, and one of the scriptures of Hinduism.The exact century of Yajurveda's composition is unknown, and estimated by scholars to be around 1200 to 1000 BCE, contemporaneous with Samaveda and Atharvaveda.Offerings of Masara (rice-barley liquor plus boiled millet) to fire. For dethroned king, for soldiers going to war for victory, for regulars to acquire cattle and wealth. A horse is released, followed by armed soldiers, wherein anyone who stops or harms the wandering horse is declared enemy of state. Stated to be more important than Purushamedha above.The horse is returned to the capital and is ceremoniously slaughtered by the soldiers. This ritual is a sacrifice for Universal Success and Prosperity.Ritual for one to be wished well, or someone leaving the home, particularly for solitude and moksha, who is offered "curd and ghee (clarified butter)".This chapter is not an external sacrifice ritual-related.

Now as a man, when embraced by a beloved wife, knows nothing that is without, nothing that is within, thus this person, when embraced by the Prajna (conscious, aware) Self, knows nothing that is without, nothing that is within.Yajurveda is a compound Sanskrit word, composed of yajus (यजुस्) and veda (वेद).Monier-Williams translates yajus as "religious reverence, veneration, worship, sacrifice, a sacrificial prayer, formula, particularly mantras muttered in a peculiar manner at a sacrifice".It is Isha Upanishad, a philosophical treatise about inner Self (Atman, Soul).The verse 40.6 states, "The man who in his Self beholds all creatures and all things that be, And in all beings sees his Self, then he doubts no longer, ponders not.

Now as a man, when embraced by a beloved wife, knows nothing that is without, nothing that is within, thus this person, when embraced by the Prajna (conscious, aware) Self, knows nothing that is without, nothing that is within.

Yajurveda is a compound Sanskrit word, composed of yajus (यजुस्) and veda (वेद).

Monier-Williams translates yajus as "religious reverence, veneration, worship, sacrifice, a sacrificial prayer, formula, particularly mantras muttered in a peculiar manner at a sacrifice".

It is Isha Upanishad, a philosophical treatise about inner Self (Atman, Soul).

The verse 40.6 states, "The man who in his Self beholds all creatures and all things that be, And in all beings sees his Self, then he doubts no longer, ponders not.

The Brihadaranyaka Upanishad is among the earliest extensive discussions of the Hindu concept of dharma, karma and moksha (liberation from sorrow, freedom, emancipation, self-realization).